Book Review: Post-Christian by Gene Edward Veith Jr.

Below is a Book Review that I wrote for the Haddington House Journal which is based out of Haddington House here in Charlottetown, PEI Canada. You can buy a copy of this journal here.

Book Review: Post-Christian by Gene Edward Veith Jr.

By Rev. Nathan Zekveld

The book Post-Christian: a Guide to Contemporary Thought and Culture, by Gene Edward
Veith Jr., is a timely and prophetic analysis of culture especially in the Western world. After all the cultural chaos of 2020, this book should help Christian laymen and pastors think through some of the cultural forces that are at work.

This book comes 26 years after Veith published his book Postmodern Times in 1994. He remarks that he thought that the bombing of the twin towers on September 11, 2001, would be the end of postmodernism. Instead it morphed and hardened in various ways. While there still remain modernists and postmodernists, many of the views at work might now be described more broadly as post-Christian. This book is a sequel to his earlier cultural analysis in 1994.

The term “Post-Christian” is not used to refer to the defeat of Christianity in the West. It is rather a term used to describe the way of thinking in the West that was shaped by Christianity, changed by secularism, and may in fact be leading many back to Christianity again. Many of the cultural revolts of the late 1900s have turned out to be self-defeating. This is “the universal wolf” that devours itself as Veith refers to cultural trends in Shakespearian terminology.

He considers the trajectory of thought in the West in four areas. In Part I, he describes this arc in terms of how we conceive of reality in the West: particularly through science, technology and reason. In Part II, he speaks about this in terms of how we conceive of the body in the West: particularly in the area of sexuality. In Part III, he focuses on society: particularly in how we perceive community following the technological and sexual revolutions. In Part IV, he hones in on religion: he focuses on the “nones” and how Christianity can respond to the growing desire to be religious.

The real genius of this book is in how the author finds common ground with many thinkers in this post-Christian age through creational realities. This is known broadly as “natural law” in Reformed theology. He continually points not only to the Word of God, but to the way in which we were created. According to the Apostle Paul in Romans 2:12-16, this knowledge is written on the consciences of men and women. Veith writes in the conclusion: “Though the postsecular public will be most interested in personal, inner spirituality – which Christianity indeed can supply them – they are also in need of a Christianity that can take them outside of themselves. They need to recover objective reality, that is, God’s creation.”1

Veith also explains how secularism is being put to the test in our Post-Christian age. We may even be headed into a post-secular age as secularism devours itself. I do wonder about this point. The year 2020 has made increasingly clear the vice-grip that secular science has as it holds both North American governments and churches. This worldview does not recognize the supremacy of God as the Creator. But then again, the author gives hope that the science will show itself to be unmoored from creational realities. By God’s grace, the flux of the times may drive people to ask questions which will bring them to the truth of the Bible.

In the middle of all the dire warnings of the pundits, and the despair of many conservative Christians in the Western Church after years of contending for the faith, this book really does offer a word of encouragement to weary Christians. The author points worn out Christians to the example of a growing commitment to Christ and His Word in countries around the world. He concludes with the testimony of thriving immigrant congregations in the West.

Gene Edward Veith Jr does an excellent job of trying to capture some of the trends in the West. He points to the sovereignty of God in all the instability of the times. His cultural analysis is a good challenge to the Church to think about her duty in the culture. It is a warning about some of the trends that are affecting members in the pew and drawing them away from the pew. He addresses the problem of privatized faith and the concern that the Church in many places has become increasingly secularized.

I would definitely recommend this book. It is great for pastors who want to help the young people in their congregations work through some of the ongoing cultural trends. It is great for high school students preparing for university, and for students going through university. It is an excellent point in time to get people thinking about new trends that have hit hard and fast between 2010 and 2020 and what we can do as Christians to witness to the Name of Christ in 2021 and the coming years. In our world, Genesis 1-3 is a great place to start. Veith puts it well in his introduction: “But Christians should be undaunted at the post-Christian onslaughts, knowing that such onslaughts are ultimately doomed, in this world as well as the next.”2

1 Gene Edward Veith, Jr., Post-Christian: a Guide to Contemporary Thought and Culture (Wheaton: Crossway, 2020), 300.

2 Ibid., 21

Photo by Allyson Beaucourt on Unsplash

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